David Seekell

Saying Goodbye to the last LOREX student in Abisko

Saying Goodbye to the last LOREX student in Abisko

The participants came to our station to do field work related to their research. They’ve shared their research as well as cultural experience they gained through this exchange programme in blog posts, videos, pictures, on our social media, in public talks, science seminars, and through their contribution in our podcast.

Good news for fishermen: “Browning” impacts fish less than expected

Water color is getting darker in lakes across the planet. This phenomenon, known as “browning,” was anticipated to cause widespread declines in fish populations. A new study by researchers from Umeå University finds that the number of fish populations impacted by browning is smaller than previously believed.

[Read More]

Original article:
David Seekell, Pär Byström, and Jan Karlsson, Lake morphometry moderates the relationship between water color and fish biomass in small boreal lakes. Limnology and Oceanography. 2018. doi: 10.1002/lno.10931

For more information, please contact:

David Seekell, Assistant professor, Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Sweden

Limnology and Oceanography Research Exchange (LOREX)

Lapporten Gerard Rocher 150630 950x400.jpg

Limnology and Oceanography Research Exchange (LOREX) is an NSF funded initiative to provide training in international research for graduate students. Graduate student research is often constrained by the resources, ideas, and culture of the home institution. International collaborations enhance graduate students’ ability to think critically and creatively, make cross-disciplinary connections, and stretch one's field of view while gaining competency in an international environment and increasing their network of colleagues.

Opportunities for research exchanges in freshwater ecology, aquatic biogeochemistry and paleolimnology are possible with CIRC at Umeå University.

[Read More]

New Paper: Lake morphometry moderates the relationship between water color and fish biomass in small boreal lakes

Globally, lake waters are thought to be getting darker due to increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon - an amalgam of thousands of uncharacterized carbon compounds that get flushed into lakes from surrounding areas. It's been predicted that this change in water color will lead to declining fish populations, but prior studies haven't considered how variations in lake depth might affect this relationship.

Seekell, D. A., P. A. Byströn, & J. Karlsson 2018. Lake morphometry moderates the relationship between water color and fish biomass in small boreal lakes. Limnology and Oceanography. Early Online. DOI: 10.1002/lno.10931

pub46_img1 1200 x 764.jpg

Climate seminar for H.M. the King of Sweden, 14 February 2018

Climate seminar for H.M. the King of Sweden, 14 February 2018

John Anderson holds the royal environmental professorship at Umeå University for 2017–2018. On Wednesday 14 February, he will together with four colleagues, hold open lectures with the Swedish King in the audience. The theme is climate effects on Northern ecosystems.

Think - Alpine Ecosystems under the microscope

Studying nature in a slow-changing climate is time-consuming. But Maja Sundqvist speeds things up by using natural variations in altitude in different mountain regions to explore how a warmer climate will affect both alpine and arctic ecosystems. 

The volume and mean depth of Earth's lakes

The volume and mean depth of Earth's lakes

http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2016GL071378 Cael et al. "The volume and mean depth of Earth's lakes" Geophysical Research Letters (2017). doi:10.1002/2016GL071378. Video produced by researchsquare.com.

Abstract

Global lake volume estimates are scarce, highly variable, and poorly documented. We developed a rigorous method for estimating global lake depth and volume based on the Hurst coefficient of Earth's surface, which provides a mechanistic connection between lake area and volume. Volume-area scaling based on the Hurst coefficient is accurate and consistent when applied to lake data sets spanning diverse regions. We applied these relationships to a global lake area census to estimate global lake volume and depth. The volume of Earth's lakes is 199,000 km3 (95% confidence interval 196,000–202,000 km3). This volume is in the range of historical estimates (166,000–280,000 km3), but the overall mean depth of 41.8 m (95% CI 41.2–42.4 m) is significantly lower than previous estimates (62–151 m). These results highlight and constrain the relative scarcity of lake waters in the hydrosphere and have implications for the role of lakes in global biogeochemical cycles.

Cael, B. B., Heathcote, A. J., & Seekell, D. A. (2017). The volume and mean depth of Earth’s lakes. Geophysical Research Letters, 44(1), 2016GL071378. doi:10.1002/2016GL071378.

Sweden – a peephole into climate changes

Sweden – a peephole into climate changes

The Earth is getting warmer, we know that. In Sweden, there are unique opportunities for researchers to examine how this fact affects the climate in Sweden and in the rest of the world. Sweden is like a peephole into the future, the water temperature rises, the glaciers are melting, the permafrost thaws. 

Epoch Times: Mindre sötvatten på jorden än man tidigare trott

Världens sjöar är generellt grundare än man trott, enligt ny forskning. Tidigare uppgifter om sötvattensmängderna på jorden har varierat mycket och har ofta presenterats utan data eller metoder som grund. Foto: Josefine Linnea Jonsson

Världens sjöar är generellt grundare än man trott, enligt ny forskning. Tidigare uppgifter om sötvattensmängderna på jorden har varierat mycket och har ofta presenterats utan data eller metoder som grund. Foto: Josefine Linnea Jonsson

"Världens sjöar är bara två tredjedelar så djupa som man tidigare trott. Forskaren David Seekell, vid Umeå Universitet, har tillsammans med kollegor använt matematisk analys för att göra en noggrannare bedömning av sötvattensmängderna i världen. Mindre vatten innebär att tillgångarna är mer sårbara för mänsklig påverkan."

Taken from: epochtimes.se

[Read More]

Science (AAAS) News: World’s lakes are much shallower than thought, mathematical analysis suggests

Science (AAAS) News: World’s lakes are much shallower than thought, mathematical analysis suggests

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA—The world’s lakes are only about two-thirds as deep, on average, as previously thought, researchers reported here this week at a meeting of the American Physical Society. If correct, the finding could help climate scientists more accurately model global climate change, as shallower lakes generate more heat-trapping methane gas.