Mountain fish threatened by warmer climate

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Climate research funded by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation

Warmer and browner water, lower oxygen levels, and a decline in food availability hit game fish hard. And greenhouse gas emissions are rising. Researchers in Umeå are trying to create a model to predict the rate at which a warming climate will impact lakes in the north.

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Reindeer grazing protects tundra plant diversity in a warming climate

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[2017-09-04] Climate warming reduces the number of plant species in the tundra, but plant-eating animals, such as reindeer and voles, can turn this negative effect into something positive. The results of a study coordinated from Umeå University in Sweden are now published in Nature Communications.

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Pressinbjudan: Upplev Arktiska dagar i Abisko 27 – 28 juni

Pressinbjudan: Upplev Arktiska dagar i Abisko 27 – 28 juni

Abisko är en plats av särskilt intresse för Umeå universitet under det arktiska året. Climate Impacts Research Centre (CIRC) med partners välkomnar till invigning av en forskningsstig för allmänheten och en forskningsbaserad lärplattform. Pressen inbjuds att uppleva arktisk klimatforskning på nära håll, en guidad tur på Nuolja forskningsstig och att avnjuta midnattssol.

Press invite: Experience Arctic Abisko 27–28 June

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[2017-06-02] Abisko in North Sweden holds a special place in the heart of Umeå University during its Arctic year in 2017. The Climate Impacts Research Centre (CIRC) and its collaborative partners bid you a warm welcome to the inauguration of a research trail aimed at the public and the Abisko Research-based Teaching Platform. The press is invited to experience Arctic climate research with a guided tour of the Nuolja research trail and a chance to enjoy the midnight sun.

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Citizen science in Abisko

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Recent coverage by the Västerbottens-Kuriren

Hoppas få hjälp av besökarna

Porträtt.
Keith Larson, forskare vid Umeå universitet och projektledare vid CIRC i Abisko, har fått närmare en halv miljon för att skapa en forskningsstig. Han hoppas att besökare i området ska hjälpa honom i hans klimatforskning.

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Sweden – a peephole into climate changes

The Earth is getting warmer, we know that. In Sweden, there are unique opportunities for researchers to examine how this fact affects the climate in Sweden and in the rest of the world. Sweden is like a peephole into the future, the water temperature rises, the glaciers are melting, the permafrost thaws. In the Swedish mountains, lakes and forests answers lie hidden on how climate change can affect the environment. Researchers Ellen Dorrepaal and David Seekell at Umeå University, David Wardle, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and Örjan Gustafsson at Stockholm University are examining what is happening to the Earth climate. https://kaw.wallenberg.org/en

Phys.org: It's a fish eat tree world: Study finds widespread support that lakes are fed by their watersheds

Phys.org: It's a fish eat tree world: Study finds widespread support that lakes are fed by their watersheds

Most of the planet's freshwater stores are found in the northern hemisphere, a region that is changing rapidly in response to human activity and shifting climatic trends. An international team of scientists analyzed 147 northern lakes and found that many rely on nutrients from tree leaves, pine needles, and other land-grown plants to feed aquatic life.

Science (AAAS) News: World’s lakes are much shallower than thought, mathematical analysis suggests

Science (AAAS) News: World’s lakes are much shallower than thought, mathematical analysis suggests

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA—The world’s lakes are only about two-thirds as deep, on average, as previously thought, researchers reported here this week at a meeting of the American Physical Society. If correct, the finding could help climate scientists more accurately model global climate change, as shallower lakes generate more heat-trapping methane gas.

Winners and losers: climate change will shift vegetation

Scientists working on super computer analysis of climate change impacts on temperature grasslands

Scientists working on super computer analysis of climate change impacts on temperature grasslands

Projected global warming will likely decrease the extent of temperate drylands by a third over the remainder of the 21st century coupled with an increase in dry deep soil conditions during agricultural growing season. These results have been presented in Nature Communications by an international collaboration led by the US Geological Survey and members from seven countries, including Scott Wilson at the Climate Impacts Research Centre (CIRC) at Umeå University.

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Temperature change affects temperate mountain ecosystems globally

The warmer climate that is expected over the next 80 years could lead to major disruptions in ecosystems of high mountain landscapes, for example by altered balance between nitrogen and phosphorus in the soil. The results in a new study are presented by an international team of researchers led by SLU in Nature. Maja Sundqvist, active researcher in the Climate Impact Research Centre (CIRC), Umeå University, participated in the study.

US ambassador visits CIRC and the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat in Abisko

Arctic research

Swedish and United States partnerships in science and the polar regions have a long history. This week the United States Ambassador Azita Raji and her team Michael J. Layne and Kristy Plan visited the Abisko Scientific Research Station to experience the Arctic in winter in Sweden first-hand.

Climate is no ubiquitous explanation of fluctuations in reindeer numbers

Exploitation of natural resources, such as forestry or gas and oil extraction, and management practices may have faster and greater impacts on reindeer populations than does climate change, a study finds. However, climate change should not be forgotten or underestimated, since reindeer are adapted to cold temperatures and therefore susceptible to temperature increases.

Prestigous environmental professor at Umeå University

Prestigous environmental professor at Umeå University

Arctic scholar and Greenland expert John Anderson, a professor at Loughborough University in England, has been designated the recipient of the HM King Carl XVI Gustaf Professor of Environmental Science 2017-18. He will be hosted by the Climate Impacts Research Centre, Department of Ecology and Environmental Science at Umeå University.