Sveriges Natur: Klimatförändringarna får kalfjället att växa igen

Klimatförändringarna får kalfjället att växa igen

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"De alpina växterna konkurreras ut, trädgränsen klättrar uppåt och längs större delen av Kungsleden vandrar man snart genom fjällbjörkskog. I fjällen syns redan tydliga spår av klimatförändringarna. Kalfjället håller på att växa igen."

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Nature Microbiology (Blog): Mega-meta-analysis of many microbes...

Mega-meta-analysis of many microbes...

Searching for global patterns of soil bacteria

Kelly S. Ramirez, Christopher G. Knight, Mattias de Hollander, Francis Q. Brearley, Bede Constantinides, Anne Cotton, Si Creer, Thomas W. Crowther, John Davison, Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, Ellen Dorrepaal, David R. Elliott, Graeme Fox, Robert I. Griffiths, Chris Hale, Kyle Hartman, Ashley Houlden, David L. Jones, Eveline J. Krab, Fernando T. Maestre, Krista L. McGuire, Sylvain Monteux, Caroline H. Orr, Wim H. van der Putten, Ian S. Roberts, David A. Robinson, Jennifer D. Rocca, Jennifer Rowntree, Klaus Schlaeppi, Matthew Shepherd, Brajesh K. Singh, Angela L. Straathof, Jennifer M. Bhatnagar, Cécile Thion, Marcel G. A. van der Heijden & Franciska T. de Vries

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The paper in Nature Microbiology is here: http://go.nature.com/2AhASzB

"It is well known that we live in a microbial world – with microbes all over our bodies, in our homes, in the air we breath, and in the ground we walk on. In the soil, these bacteria, fungi and other eukaryotes help plants grow, cycle water and important nutrients, and keep our ecosystems functioning. Researchers all over the world are using high-throughput sequencing to study these important microbes, but keeping the corresponding data catalogued and organized is a challenge - especially if we are to use it to respond to questions of global change. In our recent study, we tackle this challenge by bringing together disparate soil bacterial datasets from over 1900 soil samples collected from 21 countries spread across the world."

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Journal of Ecology (The Blog): Winter is coming but is getting warmer!

Winter is coming but is getting warmer!

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This new video podcast from Eveline Krab is dedicated to winter ecology and shows that climate warming is also happening in winter! In this video, Eveline highlights the main results of her paper recently accepted for publication in Journal of Ecology titled “Winter warming effects on tundra shrub performance are species-specific and dependent on spring conditions“.

Eveline’s video can also be found on the Journal of Ecology YouTube channel (English subtitles available).

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Airborne method of understanding northern lakes

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Airborne method of understanding northern lakes

[2017-10-04] Researchers at Umeå University in Sweden are exploring the potential to create a landscape level map of the shapes of lake basins through a laser survey. This is a critical missing piece of the puzzle for understanding the role of lake carbon cycling at large spatial scales.

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The volume and mean depth of Earth's lakes

The volume and mean depth of Earth's lakes

http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2016GL071378 Cael et al. "The volume and mean depth of Earth's lakes" Geophysical Research Letters (2017). doi:10.1002/2016GL071378. Video produced by researchsquare.com.

Abstract

Global lake volume estimates are scarce, highly variable, and poorly documented. We developed a rigorous method for estimating global lake depth and volume based on the Hurst coefficient of Earth's surface, which provides a mechanistic connection between lake area and volume. Volume-area scaling based on the Hurst coefficient is accurate and consistent when applied to lake data sets spanning diverse regions. We applied these relationships to a global lake area census to estimate global lake volume and depth. The volume of Earth's lakes is 199,000 km3 (95% confidence interval 196,000–202,000 km3). This volume is in the range of historical estimates (166,000–280,000 km3), but the overall mean depth of 41.8 m (95% CI 41.2–42.4 m) is significantly lower than previous estimates (62–151 m). These results highlight and constrain the relative scarcity of lake waters in the hydrosphere and have implications for the role of lakes in global biogeochemical cycles.

Cael, B. B., Heathcote, A. J., & Seekell, D. A. (2017). The volume and mean depth of Earth’s lakes. Geophysical Research Letters, 44(1), 2016GL071378. doi:10.1002/2016GL071378.

Mountain fish threatened by warmer climate

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Climate research funded by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation

Warmer and browner water, lower oxygen levels, and a decline in food availability hit game fish hard. And greenhouse gas emissions are rising. Researchers in Umeå are trying to create a model to predict the rate at which a warming climate will impact lakes in the north.

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Reindeer grazing protects tundra plant diversity in a warming climate

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[2017-09-04] Climate warming reduces the number of plant species in the tundra, but plant-eating animals, such as reindeer and voles, can turn this negative effect into something positive. The results of a study coordinated from Umeå University in Sweden are now published in Nature Communications.

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Pressinbjudan: Upplev Arktiska dagar i Abisko 27 – 28 juni

Pressinbjudan: Upplev Arktiska dagar i Abisko 27 – 28 juni

Abisko är en plats av särskilt intresse för Umeå universitet under det arktiska året. Climate Impacts Research Centre (CIRC) med partners välkomnar till invigning av en forskningsstig för allmänheten och en forskningsbaserad lärplattform. Pressen inbjuds att uppleva arktisk klimatforskning på nära håll, en guidad tur på Nuolja forskningsstig och att avnjuta midnattssol.

Press invite: Experience Arctic Abisko 27–28 June

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[2017-06-02] Abisko in North Sweden holds a special place in the heart of Umeå University during its Arctic year in 2017. The Climate Impacts Research Centre (CIRC) and its collaborative partners bid you a warm welcome to the inauguration of a research trail aimed at the public and the Abisko Research-based Teaching Platform. The press is invited to experience Arctic climate research with a guided tour of the Nuolja research trail and a chance to enjoy the midnight sun.

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Citizen science in Abisko

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Recent coverage by the Västerbottens-Kuriren

Hoppas få hjälp av besökarna

Porträtt.
Keith Larson, forskare vid Umeå universitet och projektledare vid CIRC i Abisko, har fått närmare en halv miljon för att skapa en forskningsstig. Han hoppas att besökare i området ska hjälpa honom i hans klimatforskning.

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Sweden – a peephole into climate changes

The Earth is getting warmer, we know that. In Sweden, there are unique opportunities for researchers to examine how this fact affects the climate in Sweden and in the rest of the world. Sweden is like a peephole into the future, the water temperature rises, the glaciers are melting, the permafrost thaws. In the Swedish mountains, lakes and forests answers lie hidden on how climate change can affect the environment. Researchers Ellen Dorrepaal and David Seekell at Umeå University, David Wardle, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and Örjan Gustafsson at Stockholm University are examining what is happening to the Earth climate. https://kaw.wallenberg.org/en

Epoch Times: Mindre sötvatten på jorden än man tidigare trott

Världens sjöar är generellt grundare än man trott, enligt ny forskning. Tidigare uppgifter om sötvattensmängderna på jorden har varierat mycket och har ofta presenterats utan data eller metoder som grund. Foto: Josefine Linnea Jonsson

Världens sjöar är generellt grundare än man trott, enligt ny forskning. Tidigare uppgifter om sötvattensmängderna på jorden har varierat mycket och har ofta presenterats utan data eller metoder som grund. Foto: Josefine Linnea Jonsson

"Världens sjöar är bara två tredjedelar så djupa som man tidigare trott. Forskaren David Seekell, vid Umeå Universitet, har tillsammans med kollegor använt matematisk analys för att göra en noggrannare bedömning av sötvattensmängderna i världen. Mindre vatten innebär att tillgångarna är mer sårbara för mänsklig påverkan."

Taken from: epochtimes.se

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New CIRC paper: Winter ecology of a subalpine grassland

New CIRC paper: Winter ecology of a subalpine grassland

Snow cover is essential for the functioning of seasonally snow-covered ecosystems such as mountain grasslands and alterations therein due to global warming can have strong implications for the ecology and biogeochemical processes in these systems

Phys.org: It's a fish eat tree world: Study finds widespread support that lakes are fed by their watersheds

Phys.org: It's a fish eat tree world: Study finds widespread support that lakes are fed by their watersheds

Most of the planet's freshwater stores are found in the northern hemisphere, a region that is changing rapidly in response to human activity and shifting climatic trends. An international team of scientists analyzed 147 northern lakes and found that many rely on nutrients from tree leaves, pine needles, and other land-grown plants to feed aquatic life.

Science (AAAS) News: World’s lakes are much shallower than thought, mathematical analysis suggests

Science (AAAS) News: World’s lakes are much shallower than thought, mathematical analysis suggests

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA—The world’s lakes are only about two-thirds as deep, on average, as previously thought, researchers reported here this week at a meeting of the American Physical Society. If correct, the finding could help climate scientists more accurately model global climate change, as shallower lakes generate more heat-trapping methane gas.

Winners and losers: climate change will shift vegetation

Scientists working on super computer analysis of climate change impacts on temperature grasslands

Scientists working on super computer analysis of climate change impacts on temperature grasslands

Projected global warming will likely decrease the extent of temperate drylands by a third over the remainder of the 21st century coupled with an increase in dry deep soil conditions during agricultural growing season. These results have been presented in Nature Communications by an international collaboration led by the US Geological Survey and members from seven countries, including Scott Wilson at the Climate Impacts Research Centre (CIRC) at Umeå University.

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Temperature change affects temperate mountain ecosystems globally

The warmer climate that is expected over the next 80 years could lead to major disruptions in ecosystems of high mountain landscapes, for example by altered balance between nitrogen and phosphorus in the soil. The results in a new study are presented by an international team of researchers led by SLU in Nature. Maja Sundqvist, active researcher in the Climate Impact Research Centre (CIRC), Umeå University, participated in the study.

US ambassador visits CIRC and the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat in Abisko

Arctic research

Swedish and United States partnerships in science and the polar regions have a long history. This week the United States Ambassador Azita Raji and her team Michael J. Layne and Kristy Plan visited the Abisko Scientific Research Station to experience the Arctic in winter in Sweden first-hand.

Climate is no ubiquitous explanation of fluctuations in reindeer numbers

Exploitation of natural resources, such as forestry or gas and oil extraction, and management practices may have faster and greater impacts on reindeer populations than does climate change, a study finds. However, climate change should not be forgotten or underestimated, since reindeer are adapted to cold temperatures and therefore susceptible to temperature increases.