Jonatan Klaminder

Climate change induced regime shifts in Northern lake ecosystems

Sunset over lake Törnetrask (as seen from the Abisko Scientific Research Station)

Sunset over lake Törnetrask (as seen from the Abisko Scientific Research Station)

Climate change induced regime shifts in Northern lake ecosystems

Project Summary

A present major scientific challenge is to understand and predict effects of climate change on lake ecosystems and the services they deliver. Globally, lakes are concentrated at northern latitudes where the magnitude of climate change is expected to be strongest. Recent advances in lake research suggest that responses of Northern lakes to global warming are fundamentally different from the expectations based on conventional knowledge. This project brings together new tools and concepts in biogeochemistry and ecology, with the aims of understanding and predicting the effects of climate change on the delivery of two major ecosystem services, fish production and the net greenhouse gas balance of Northern lakes.

Specific objectives include:

  1. Assessment of long vs. short term effects of climate change;
  2. Assessment of nonlinear dynamics and regime shifts; and,
  3. Projection of responses to future climate conditions.

The project’s core is made up of a multi-scale (pond to whole-lake) experimental test of ecosystem responses to increases in temperature and precipitation/runoff. Further, we will use aDNA techniques to address past regime shifts and ecosystem resilience to climate change from paleolimnological sediment records. Finally, the project will develop process-based models to be used in the projection of future conditions in lakes at the whole ecosystem scale.

Project Dates: 2017-2021

Funding Organizations

Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation

Collaborators

David Bastviken, Linköping University
Ann-Kristin Bergström, Umeå University
Christian Bigler, Umeå University
Richard Bindler, Umeå University
Åke Brännström, Umeå University
Pär Byström, Umeå University
Sebastian Diehl, Umeå University
Isabelle Domaizon, French National Institute for Agricultural Research
Göran Englund, Umeå University
Cristian Gudasz, Umeå University
Dag Hessen, Oslo University, Norway
Jonatan Klaminder, Umeå University
Sally MacIntyre, University of California Santa Barbara, USA
Frank Peeters, University of Konstanz, Germany
André de Roos, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Martin Rosvall, Umeå University
David Seekell, Umeå University
Ryan Sponseller, Umeå University
Xiau-Ru Wang, Umeå University
Marcus Klaus, Umeå University

A cross-system analysis of ecological change in Kangerlussuaq (SW Greenland) and Torneträsk (Northern Sweden)

A cross-system analysis of ecological change in Kangerlussuaq (SW Greenland) and Torneträsk (Northern Sweden)

Project Summary

One of the major constraints on critically evaluating the causes of ecological change in sensitive arctic ecosystems is the lack of long-term monitoring. The area around Torneträsk in Northern Sweden and Kangerlussuaq in south-west Greenland are two of the more extensively studied arctic lake districts. As well as the benefits associated with long-term monitoring and having contrasting climates (low versus sub-arctic; precipitation), the two areas also differ in some key characteristics, most notably, surface water hydrology, in-lake DOC concentration and characteristics, terrestrial vegetation. However, as well as these climate and ecological differences, both areas have had the benefits of palaeolimnological studies, field experiments and integrated lake-catchment studies. In this project we will synthesize the available data from these areas using novel statistical approaches to understand the key drivers of ecological changes at a range of timescales.

Collaborators

Jan Karlsson, Umeå University
Jonatan Klaminder, Umeå University
Bror Holmgren (PhD student), Umeå University

 

Quantifying cryogenic soil-mixing in the tundra soil and its role for the long-term carbon cycling in the arctic

Suoro fieldcrew Keith Larson 20150715.jpg

Quantifying cryogenic soil-mixing in the tundra soil and its role for the long-term carbon cycling in the arctic

Project Summary

Tundra soils play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Tundra regions are warming rapidly due to the ongoing global warming, and there are concerns that this will reduce the accumulation rate of carbon in tundra soils. It is even feared, that from being a sink, these soils will instead become a significant source of carbon to the atmosphere, which will add to the currently increasing levels of greenhouse gases. In the discussion about changed carbon cycling due to changed climate in tundra regions, temperature dependent decomposition processes and changed plant productivity rates have been the main mechanisms studied although it has been suggested that soil frost processes, might be of more importance for the fat of the soil carbon pool than temperature dependent microbial processes. The objective with my research project is to test this hypothesis.

Collaborators

Marina Becher, Umeå University